Free Game Analysis: Strategy in the Veresov

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Even with term finals coming up, I’ve snuck in a few blitz games! Here’s a fun position I got with White… Good luck finding a non-losing for Black!

Without any new tournament games to share with you all for my post today, I was delighted when I recieved a Free Game Analysis request from a strong player in the Pittsburgh area last week. As many of you know, Chess^Summit offers Free Game Analysis to all of our readers, and if you want to join the fun, you can send your game PGNs to chess.summit@gmail.com, along with any questions you may have about the game!

Today’s game was submitted by Pitt teammate Behnam Esymali. Behnam recently crossed 2000 at the Pennsylvania State Championships, and has since proven to be a cornerstone of the University of Pittsburgh Chess team in our local league matches. Off the chess board, Behnam is working on his PhD in mathematics, and writes regularly for the American Mathematical Society Graduate Student Blog (you can check out an article of his here!).

In his game today, Behnam chose the Veresov as White, an opening I discussed extensively for Black in my post about my World Open post last summer. While the Veresov doesn’t really promise any advantage for White, its rarity has made it a good surprise weapon. Even at the Grandmaster level, these 1. d4 d5 2. Nc3 openings have started to gain attention, particularly from Baadur Jobava, the star of the Baku Olympiad.

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The focus for today’s post. Does White have anything after the push 4. e3, or does Black get an easy equality? Even without the most accurate play Black got a respectable position.

What I like about this game is that it shows that even if you want to avoid main line openings, you still need to have some theoretical understanding to put together the best blueprint for the middlegame. In this opening, White erred as early as move four and was stuck with an equal position until the early middlegame when Black misunderstood the position and left his king exposed in exchange for a pawn. Moral of the story? Know your openings!

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