Manhattan Open

And my summer chess adventures continue. This time I headed to the Manhattan Open, which took place only a few blocks from Times Square. Let me just tell you that going out for lunch was a test of ingenuity and persistence navigating through throngs of tourists. Manhattan Open was only 5 rounds, but it was surprisingly strong with 7 GMs in attendance! For me, it was an excellent local practice tournament with nothing big at stake.

In round 1, I won a fairly clean game with black against Juan Sena (2222 USCF, 1996 FIDE). An interesting idea in the opening worked very well, and I was much better by move 20. I went on to convert without problem. Yay, I finally won a first round!

Round 2 was a tough game for me. I got white against Stanislav Busygin (2293 USCF, 2167 FIDE). I nursed a slight edge and got a very good position, but it wasn’t easy to get through. His defense was sturdy, and he didn’t give me many opportunities. Eventually, after a few inaccuracies/mistakes from both sides, we reached this position.

Busygin_2 1

It’s a knight endgame with equal material, but white clearly has the upper hand with his Nc5. White should engineer a b3-b4 breakthrough to get a passer on the a-file. What else to do? However, black has Ne4 ideas, which will cause trouble. Patience with 53.Kd3 or 53.Kc2 is best, and white has very good winning chances. Instead, I decided to immediately go 53.b4?. The most critical move here is 53… Ne4+, leading to a pawn endgame after 54.Nxe4 axb4+ 55.Kxb4 dxe4. The key line there is 56.Kc3 Kb6 57.Kd2 Ka5 58.Ke3 Kxa4 59.Kxe4

Busygin_2 2

White has gone after black’s e-pawn, and black has gone after white’s a-pawn in response. That’s all fairly natural. Now, if white could take the d4- and c6-pawns off the board, he’d be winning because his king rushes in to the kingside. Black should therefore go back 59… Kb5, and after 60.d5 he has 60… Kc5! saving the day. I was toying with 60.Kd3, but white has no magic. 60… Kb4 holds without a problem since 61.d5 is again met with 61… Kc5!. It’s a draw. I did see this, though I’m not sure if I boiled it down to the end before or after I played 53.b4. I did (incorrectly) feel that I had blown a large chunk of my advantage in the past few moves, and I saw some ghosts if I waited with my king. In simple English, I bluffed and in retrospect am not sure why.

Fortunately, my opponent went 53… axb4+?, and everything was back on track. After 54.Kxb4 black is in a bad situation, and passive defense with 54… Nc8? didn’t help. White will push his a-pawn, go after black’s kingside pawns with his knight, and infiltrate with his king to c5 and beyond. I won a few moves later.

After that long game and lunch with a friend, there was no time whatsoever to prepare before the next round. I got double white against Justin Chen (2354 USCF, 2249 FIDE). The game didn’t go according to plan. My opening was fairly toothless, and my attempts to gain an advantage led to a worse endgame. Fortunately, I held it without any serious problems. I was hoping for more, but 2.5/3 was not a score to whine about—especially considering how I’ve been starting my tournaments recently…

In round 4, I made another draw with black against GM Sergey Kudrin (2537 USCF, 2456 FIDE). The game was approximately equal throughout, and when he offered a draw, I decided to take it. I had 3/4 going into the last round, and that’s the game where I wanted to take my chances. Since I got a double white in rounds 2 and 3, the pairing program didn’t object to me getting black again in the last round, this time against Wesley Wang (2408 USCF, 2328 FIDE). Out of the opening, we reached this strange position.

Wesley 1

White does appear to be a bit overextended and badly coordinated, but this should dissipate once he castles. 16.Qd2 and 16.Bxb6 Qxb6 17.g3 are white’s best options, after which the position is approximately equal. Instead, Wesley played the most logical move 16.Bb5+?. 16… Nc6 appears to be forced, and white shouldn’t have any real problems after 17.0-0 0-0 18.Bxb6 Qxb6 19.Nc3, to show one variation. But wait, is 16… Nc6 forced? It isn’t! I correctly played the cold-blooded 16… Bd7! which throws a huge wrench in white’s works. On the surface it looks impossible, but after both 17.Bxd7+ Qxd7 18.Bxb6 Nxg2+ 19.Ke2 Qb5+ and 17.Bxb6 Nxg2+ 18.Kf1 (18.Kd2 Qxb6 19.Bxd7+ Kxd7) 18… Bxb5+ 19.Kxg2 Qxb6, black is a pawn up. 17.Bxd7+ Qxd7 18.0-0 fails to 18… Bxd4 19.Nxd4 Qxd4! 20.Qxd4 Ne2+ winning a piece. This is a bad sign for white…

17.Nc3 and 17.Na3 were the least evils for white, though black will have an edge after 17… Bxd4 18.Nxd4 0-0. Instead, Wesley decided to go 17.Bxd7+ Qxd7 18.c3

Wesley 2

This looked precariously bad for white. Black just has so many ideas: Nd3+, Nxg2+, Qb5, etc. One of them is bound to work. 18… Nbd3+ 19.Kf1 Bxd4 is black’s best option. If 20.Nxd4 Nxe5, black is up a clean pawn, and white’s position is bad anyway. 20.cxd4 annoyed me, but I missed the simple idea that after 20… 0-0 21.g3, black has 21… Rc8! 22.gxf4 Rc1 winning the queen and the game. And that’s not the only good variation black has at his disposal… Instead of doing this, however, I overthought my next move and overlooked a simple hole in my main line. I went 18… Bxd4 19.cxb4 Qb5? (19… Bb6! was still very good for black). After 20.Nxd4 I realized what I had missed.

Wesley 3

I thought that after 20… Qxb4+ 21.Kf1 Qc4+, white has to go 22.Kg1, after which I have 22… Qxd4 23.Qxd4 Ne2+, winning the piece back. However, I missed that white can simply go 22.Ne2!. I had technically been planning on postponing operation Qc4+ by first going 21… 0-0, but white could go Ne2 there too. OOPS!! This wasn’t part of my plan. I decided to make the best of things by going 20… Nxg2+ 21.Kd2 Qxe5

Wesley 4

Black has two pawns for the piece, and white’s king is really shaky. Black clearly is a happy camper here, but what he could’ve had before was much better. 22.Kc1 0-0 23.Nc2 is probably white’s best shot, but Wesley went for the adventurous (but bad) 22.Qa4+? Ke7 23.Qa7 Rd8 24.Kc3

Wesley 6

White’s knight is awkwardly pinned in the middle, but if black carelessly goes 24… Nf4?, he’ll get hit with 25.Qc5+! trading the queens off and solving white’s problems. In light of that, I played 24… Kf6!. The point is that 25.Qc5 will now be met with 25… Rd5. Black’s Kf6 looks very strange, but it’s safe! Next up is Nf4 followed by Ne2+, further bombarding Nd4. 25.Nd2 Nf4 26.N2f3 is white’s best chance to hang on, but his king is an endangered species after 26… Qd6. Instead, Wesley chose 25.Na3, but after 25… Nf4 26.Nac2 Ne2+ 27.Kd3 Nxd4 28.Nxd4 Qd5!, white is going to lose his pinned knight after …e5. After 29.Qb6 Rd6 30.Qc5 e5, Wesley resigned.

Overall, I got 4/5, landed myself in a 7-way tie for second, and gained a few rating points. Not complaining. Congratulations to GM Aleksandr Lenderman who won clear first with 5/5. My summer run continues with the Washington International, a 9-round norm tournament which starts this Saturday. Over 20 GMs are registered, and I’m barely in the top half. Fingers crossed…

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