Third Time’s the Charm: The Middlegame

After the first 3 rounds of the Southwest Class, I had 3/3, which included wins against 2 GMs. This was obviously a perfect start. However, in the next three rounds, aka the “middlegame” of the tournament, I got hit with some serious turbulence.

In round 4, I got black against GM Razvan Preotu (2522 FIDE, 2590 USCF). I lost a pawn out of a bad opening, but fortunately I had serious compensation. I scraped my way back to equality, and then…

Preotu 1

This knight endgame is slightly more pleasant for white, but black shouldn’t be in any trouble here, right…? I decided to activate my knight here with 45… Nf7, though 45… a5, preventing white from playing b4, may have been easier. After 46.b4, I made an inexplicable decision: I played 46… Kb6? allowing white to play 47.b5. I instead should’ve played 46… a6, and black really has no problems after that one. For some reason, however, I thought I should also be holding easily after my move.

Preotu 2

Now black is starting to get a bit cramped. Over the next few moves I continued to drift: 47… Kc7 48.Kc5 Ng5 49.Nf4 Ne4+ 50.Kb4 Ng5 51.Ka5 Kb7 52.g3 Kc7 53.Ka6 Kb8 54.Nd3

Preotu 3

Here I played 54… Ne4? which is officially a mistake. Instead, I had to play 54… Nf7, which ties the white knight down to the e5-pawn and takes the d6-square away from the white king if he plays like he did in the game. Black should be holding here, but after my move he’s in huge trouble. My opponent correctly played 55.g4! Ka8 56.b6 axb6 57.Kxb6 Kb8.

Preotu 4

After 58.Kc6 Kc8 59.Nf4, black is probably lost, since after 59… Ng5 60.Kd6, white is winning the e6-pawn. Instead, my opponent played it the other way around with 58.Nf4? Ng5 59.Kc6, walking into 59… Nf7! hitting the e5-pawn. If white retreats with 60.Nd3, black can simply play 60… Kc8 and white can’t get through. My opponent played 60.Nxe6 and offered a draw, which I accepted.

Phew! One of these days I’ll lose a game for playing like this, and it’ll serve me damn right.

3.5/4, 3 GMs and 3 foreigners down. Not bad!

In round 5, I got white against the top seed GM Jeffery Xiong (2666 FIDE, 2750 USCF). Rating-wise this game would be a tough order, but I had white and was in good form…

Xiong 1

So far, everything was all right. I didn’t get any advantage with white, but I wasn’t worse either. Still, there were a lot of pieces on the board, and anything could happen. After the best move 20.Be4!, improving my bishop and attacking the b7-pawn, the positon is around equal. I instead played 20.Bf5?! and missed the tricky move 20… Nh4

Xiong 2

I should’ve played 21.Bxb6, but I was worried about 21… Qxd1 22.Raxd1 Nxf3+ 23.gxf3 fxe6.

Xiong 3

This isn’t so pleasant for white, but in reality, the position isn’t far from equal after 24.Kh2 or 24.Re4 Nxh3+ 25.Kg2 Ng5 26.Rb4. Look what I did instead:

21.Nxh4? Bxd4 22.Qg4? Nd3 23.Red1 Bxf2+ 24.Kh2

Xiong 4

I admittedly missed the very strong 24… Rc4!, but even after a move like 24… Ne5 black is much better. After 25.Qf3 Qxh4 26.Bxe6 fxe6 27.Qxd3 Qf4, I went down pretty quickly.

Okay, what was that…? It was my first setback, and considering that I still had a 2600+ performance, I managed to brush this game off pretty easily.

In round 6, I got black against IM Omer Reshef (2491 FIDE, 2566 USCF). I didn’t hold back at all in this wildly complicated game. My silicon friend points that white did have a big advantage at a few moments, but to my human eyes, the position was just unclear.

Reshsef 1

Material is technically equal here, but white has a central pawn mass versus black’s b-pawns. There’s quite a commotion in the center of the board. And this was after the position calmed down a bit! I honestly wasn’t sure which result I was playing for, but I knew I had to act fast. I played the logical 23… Re6 but missed some details after 24.Qf4, after which I came to the conclusion that I was in trouble. I actually had 24… b5!, a move which I don’t think I even considered, at my disposal. Black has threats including Nxc3 Bxc3 Bd6 and Bb2. White is actually the one who has to play for equality with 25.Qd4! Bb2 26.Qxd8 Rxd4 27.Bd4.

Instead of that, I made a serious mistake with 24… Nxc3. The game continued 25.Bxc3 Bd6 (25… Rxe2 26.Qg4 g6 27.Rd7 Qc8 28.Qd4 is also unpleasant for black) 26.Qd4 Qg5

Reshef 2

27.Rd7! attacking the bishop would’ve given me a run for my money, since I simply won’t have time to take the e2-pawn. My opponent played 27.Rxb7 instead, which is strong but not best. After 27… Bc5 28.Qf4 Qxf4 29.gxf4 Rxe2 30.d4 Bd6, the dust settled.

Reshef 3

White is going to be a pawn up once he collects the b3-pawn, and he’ll have a dangerous passed d-pawn. This is far from easy for black, but it could’ve been worse. Though my play wasn’t the best, after defending for 55 moves, I managed to make a draw.

1/3 in this phase of the tournament wasn’t ideal, but it was a decent result given my opposition. I still had a 2600+ performance, was gaining plenty of rating, and was having a good time. Now all that was needed for a GM Norm was to maintain a 2600+ performance. By my estimates, I would need to score 2/3 or 2.5/3 in the last 3 rounds, which is obviously much easier said than done.

Next up, the endgame!

One thought on “Third Time’s the Charm: The Middlegame

  1. Pingback: Third Time’s the Charm: The GM Norm Endgame – chess^summit

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