What can you learn from blitz games?

There is an interesting debate on the value of blitz tournaments and games.

Whether it’s useful to play blitz games to improve your chess, or from a broader point of view, does blitz attracts more audience to the chess game.

My answers to both of these questions are resounding yes. I’ll leave the debate and my own opinions for a different time.

However, regardless your opinion, what you should definitely consider is to review and learn from your own blitz games just like a standard game.

We’ll review three snippets of my recent blitz games played both over the board (at CCSCATL) and online. Below are three themes we’ll discuss in this post:

  1. Learning to thrive in Complications
  2. Improving Intuition
  3. Searching for unexpected tactics

Complication

blitz1

White to Move

After an unsound sacrifice in the opening, I got into the above position.

Here I can feel there are compensations, as black’s king is not able to castle, thus hard to connect the rooks. Plus all of white pieces are ready to jump in for any impeding attack.

White has two choices:

  • Bxg7
  • Rxe7

I took on e7, because I wanted to keep the dark square bishop. However, with closer inspection, possibly Bxg7 is a more objective try.

After a few more moves, we reached the next critical point.

blitz2

Black to Move

Question: would you play:

  • Bb5 or
  • Bg4

Blitz games give many opportunities to make mistakes. And it’s helpful to train your own tolerance of complications.

Intuition

In the position below, I pushed my pawn b3-b4, feeling good about the sacrifice.

blitz3

Black to Move

Here I thought Bxb4 is not possible due to Qa4. But my intuition failed and I missed the critical variation.

Question: can you calculate the variation to the ensuing endgame after all the trades and evaluate why black is clearly better in that position?

Unexpected tactics

blitz4

White to Move

I was playing black and feeling confident about the position. The game continued with Rxd2 exd2, and then Qe3 winning white’s e2-bishop.

However, when I entered the game into the computer, to my surprise, Stockfish told me it was +0.4 in this position.

Question: what did both side miss for white to counter attack?

———-

There are many instructional moments in blitz games, and the value is in understanding the nuance just like reviewing standard games.

Next time you get a chance to play blitz, make sure you can extract value from these games.

P.s. Feel free to answer the questions in the comment section.

Advertisements

Quiet Struggle in Orlando

Welcome to the 2018 Chess^Summit Journey!

To start off, we’ll take a look at a game from the K-4 Grade Championships in December.

A contrast to the chaotic roller coaster game analysis last time, this game is a quiet struggle between two up-and-coming young scholastic players.

You can find the game Annotations HERE. Below are a two quick diagrams.

1                                          Avoid creating long term weaknesses (b7-b5)

2

Black to move. Rfd8 or h6?


To summarize, below are two take away from the game:

  1. Avoid creating long term weaknesses from short term attack (15…b5)
  2. Look for prophylactic moves when the position is calm

Hope you enjoy! Happy New Years!

Free Game Analysis: Putting it All Together

In one of my earlier articles, “Analyze This”, I discussed a basic, multi-dimensional approach to analyzing a game. This method discussed physically replaying the game on a board as well as leveraging an engine to confirm decisions or show alternatives then comparing the two. In my last article of 2017 I will go through a brief but illustrative example of putting this method into action.

This game was recently submitted for analysis at Chess^Summit, a game between myself and someone I have been playing with for some time. The game took place back in September and is brief at only twelve moves, but in those moves I can showcase the tools made available in the framework I have discussed for self-analysis. First, let’s take a look at the scorecard and run through the game.

card1

I first played through the game on a board and made some notes as I progressed. I played from each side of the board and considered alternate moves, what my idea was, what my opponent’s idea was or may have been, and where the advantage rested. Being as the game is a few months old, my ideas and playing style have changed a bit. That being said, going over older games is a great way to gauge progress as well as observe bad habits or positive trends. Now that we’ve put the board away, let’s load the pgn into an engine and compare our observations to the database.

chessbase0

I have been doing much of my analysis in the free version of ChessBase Reader 2017. This free but powerful software is a basic version of the industry standard and has a very user-friendly interface. I’ve highlighted the Kibitzer option at the top of the screen. This feature will show where an advantage lies and which moves are traitionally best. I have also highlighted the opening bar. If you are unsure what opening you or your opponent are playing or choosing a variation from, look no further than this bar. Now, let’s explore this game…

chessbase1 After the move e4, we can observe the Kibitzer in action at the bottom of the screen. As you can see there is little in the way of an advantage after this first move, (0.01) denoting a miniscule advantage to white if black were to play e5. You can also see a very common continuing line.

chessbase2Alright, now we are five moves into the game and we can see the Kibitzer thinking. We can see from this position that white is making a supported threat to the King with a minor piece. We can also see the control the pair of Knights has on the center of the board and that white has a fair lead in development. In the opening I compare development, King safety, central control or possession, and pawn structure. White is one step away from castling whereas if black  wants to castle short they must deflect the attack by white, use two tempi to move pieces and a tempo to castle. While both sides are missing a strong central pawn, black has had their piece routed to the side by capturing and white has many avenues to protect the King while exerting further pressure on black.

chessbase3

Following the scorecard, we can see that move 10 is where the noose starts to really tighten for black. White identifies the weak f7 square and looks for a way to exploit it. Offering the Bishop, white could either try to compensate and recapture or go further into the enemy camp and end the game. Black’s Bishop attempts to threaten the Queen on move 11 with …Bf6, but with that move it is too late, Qxf7#.

While it worked for white in this example, looking back and knowing what I have learned from my coach, studying, and much reading, I have to embarrassingly admit I violated some fairly basic principles in pursuit of a relentless attack, something that admittedly was very much my style in the past. Instead of Nc6, if black played Bd7 it would have been a very different game. Another opportunity black missed was move 11; Qe7 would have undermined white’s attack on f7. While many observations and notes could be and some have been made for every move in this game, for the sake of this article I will sum up my analysis with three key observations for both sides:

My top 3 takeaways for white in this game, good and bad, are:

  1. Sometimes you might get lucky, but loose or poorly supported attacks in the opening can be easily countered and put you at a significant disadvantage or cost you the game.
  2. White developed their minor pieces quickly and attacked with all the pieces.
  3. White kept consistent pressure on their opponent and didn’t leave much breathing room, but some of these moves could have crippled white’s further attack if black had countered or responded in a different way.

My top 3 takeaways for black this game are:

  1. Look at the whole board when considering your next move. Try to think WHY your opponent made that move or attack and consider what if any other pieces may be teaming up to take down the King.
  2. Identify weak squares and maintain awareness of them; again, multiple attackers were focused on that pesky f7 square and had significant firepower directed at it. A position such as this should send up some red flags
  3. When the Queen and a minor piece are in your camp and eyeing up your King, you may need to exchange or counter to survive. Options to artificially castle are present even if you need to exchange Queens and capture with the King.

I hope this brief example of leveraging technology in tandem with using your brain and growing situational awareness has helped. I’m happy I can utilize this game between a chess.com friend and myself as an introductory example of self-analysis. I feel this is a nice follow-up to my prior article on analysis and should give you all the tools you need to being your journey. As you progress and analyze your games you will begin to see trends and have data to back it up. The immense power of modern chess engines is incredible and much of it is absolutely free; I’ve attached a link to ChessBase Reader below if you’re interested.

Have a wonderful and safe holiday! I promise we at Chess^Summit will be growing and are excited for what 2018 will have to offer you. I can’t wait to share the future, our future and the future of this game we love with you!

xmas

See you in 2018,

-Dan

https://en.chessbase.com/pages/download

 

Free Game Analysis: Roller Coaster Ride in Philly

Do you enjoy roller coaster rides? If so, our reader Varun provides a thrilling ride in a game he played during the 2017 National Chess Congress in Philadelphia.

I’ve provided diagrams to highlight three ‘don’t hold your breathe’ moments, two out of the three were “oh-no” moments. Try to answer the questions yourself before read thru the game notes.

You can play along the GAME HERE.

dec03_analysis_a

Black to move. What does your sacrifice instinct say?

dec03_analysis_b

Why was black’s last move 25…d4 a blunder? White to move, find the best move.

dec03_analysis_c

White returns the favor and the game by playing 53. Ke4. Why is that the case. Black to move and win.


Whewww. Not a game for the fainted heart!

This game clearly shows that our reader, Varun, was ready to battle, and he did not consider calling it a day after early mishaps. In the end, he was rewarded handsomely.

To summarize, below are three take away from the game:

1. Opening: activate the c8-bishop before playing e6

2. In winning positions: slow down, make prophylaxis moves to avoid unnecessary chaos

3. Be tenacious to the end, and turn the table when your opponent provides the opportunity


We’ve observed an exciting game here, now it’s time for us to produce our own thrilling experience.

If you have a game that you’d like to be analyzed. Please head over HERE and submit the game to the chess^summit team.

Good Luck to the next ride!

Analyze This

Mikhail Botvinnik, legendary world champion and a pioneer of computer chess, once said “chess is the art of analysis.” Indeed, anyone who plays the game long enough will see that it is a sempiternal exercise in examination and re-examination. By examining one’s own games and those of other players and masters, you can begin to see patterns or discover better moves. Quality analysis and the ability to analyze are essential for any player to grow and become a strong competitor. And now with incredible advancements in technology and the seemingly endless amount of options and platforms to find digital chess analysis, there is an unprecedented amount of information available. So, considering all the information above, where do you start?

mikhail
If you are newer to the game, the best analysis would be a one on one with a coach or an experienced player. While having a computer program analyze your game has many advantages, it is a bit too much information for someone new to the game and will not help you develop the same way a human can. Much like a soccer coach watching video after a game and going over it with their team, a trained and experienced eye can spot mistakes or opportunities you may otherwise overlook. For instance, when I first started playing my coach noted that I was very inconsistent with developing my minor pieces early in the game. By doing this I was giving away tempi and crippling my attack. This observation would not be noted if I simply used a computer to show blunders and best moves. The best way I can put it is that a human can give you a unique perspective and develop you into a well-rounded player, a computer will build upon this foundation and present other opportunities.
Another way that a coach can help your development is by analyzing well-known games or educational ones with you. My coach recommended analyzing some of Jose Capablanca’s games, games that exemplified what topic or idea he was trying to share with me at that time. I analyzed these games on my own, playing them out on a board then on a computer with and without an analysis engine running. Lastly, my coach and I went over a game together. This comprehensive, well-rounded analysis not only improved my understanding of some core concepts my coach was trying to teach through the game, but also helped my board memory, gave me some new ideas in certain situations, and boosted my confidence in my ability to analyze games. This exercise helped establish a foundation I still use today and will continue to use throughout my career.
Once you have learned how to analyze a game, you could and really should analyze any games you find interesting whether they be yours or someone else’s. First, play through the game a few times on your own to see the flow. Look for any ideas that jump out at you or anything you find noteworthy. This part of the game is a bit of homework, so you really must keep a notebook handy. A fun exercise is to guess the move then compare your decision to that of the other player. When you do this, ask “why was that move picked?” “why that move instead of this one?” “how would I respond to that move?”. This type of methodical and deliberate examination and study will develop your awareness and your understanding even further.
A very popular and tremendously productive way to analyze your play is with an engine. From top level players like Vishy Anand to club players, this is a common practice and in today’s competitive environment, an absolute necessity. The number of engines out there and the millions of games recorded is staggering. Do you want to see what your favorite player’s most successful opening is? It’s there. What percentage of games with the c4 “English” opening, on average, end with a win for white? That information is there too. Computer analysis can be a double-edged sword for the inexperienced or unguided, however. Without a sound understanding of the games fundamentals and mechanics, you can easily fall down a rabbit hole and be quickly misdirected. Personally, I suggest holding off on computer analysis until it is recommended to you by your coach or a trusted, experienced player. Used in conjunction with coaching and guidance, this technology is indeed a very powerful analytical tool that will certainly bring your play to the next level.
So where should you begin? To get started, pick a game, any game. This game can be one of your own or just one your find interesting. I strongly recommend you play through it a few times on a board, preferably one with algebraic coordinates to make following or adjusting notation easier. The reason I recommend a board is the distinct view and feel you gain. You can walk around the board or view it from angles that you cannot from a static 2d board. It may sound silly, but I gain much perspective this way and find it notably more productive than just playing on my laptop. If available, walk through the match a few times with another player or a coach. This can bring up some dialogue or showcase ideas you may not have reached on your own. For as much time as we spend buried in our phones, books, or computers, chess is after all a social game and one that generates conversation.

3
Once you have played through the match a few times from both sides of the board, either create or load up a PGN of the game.

arrow

I use chess.com and its powerful Stockfish engine to analyze games. This one tool offers so much information it is without equal on many levels. 1. You can see what advantage is to whom with a basic black and white bar, essentially a tug of war. 2. You can see what moves are most commonly played and what their outcomes are. You can explore other options for certain situations or identify blunders. In the example below, I have highlighted these features on move 7 of a recent game. I am playing as black here. You can see I have a 1.64 advantage (shows as -1.64 when you are playing as black). You can also see a few moves and what advantage they would gain or leave.

analysis1
I hope you now see the options available to you and feel inspired to dive in and analyze this beautiful game. There has truly never been a better time to be a chess player with all the resources and powerful tools available, many for free. A great option I truly cannot recommend enough is a high-quality analysis right here on Chess^Summit. Our dedicated and skilled team will give you an expert analysis to help you develop absolutely free.

https://chesssummit.com/category/free-game-analysis/

analysis2

When to (not) Break Out …f6?

If you play the French often enough, you have probably seen the …f6 break as a common theme to equalize space. One common example comes from the 3. Nd2 Tarrasch main line:

Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 5.51.22 PM
After 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. Bd3 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Ne2 cxd4 8. cxd4

Here, Black can eliminate the cramping e5-pawn with 8…f6 with good piece play and open f-file, at the cost of a somewhat bad bishop and backward e-pawn.

However, there are many different variations and subvariations in which one can consider an …f6 break (in non-Tarrasch lines as well), and suffice to say that not all of them are good. Admittedly, I’m not an expert in the French, and I’m not sure how much studying one would have to do to cover all of these scenarios. My personal advice is to not break out …f6 when in doubt, since it does create weaknesses and in many cases can be delayed with few major consequences.

It’s easy to take the …f6 break for granted in lines like the above, but it does weaken Black’s center (two hanging pawns) and king. It (more or less) works for Black in the above Tarrasch because White’s pieces are not well-developed enough to take advantage of the weaknesses too soon and Black is positioned well to defend and even counter-attack due to the open lines created by …f6.

On the other hand, consider this position I recently happened upon from a Pittsburgh weekend tournament game between two experts:

Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 6.10.10 PM
After 7. Be3

Black played 7…f6 here. At first it doesn’t look too bad because the center is relatively closed and White hasn’t castled. But White’s pieces are much more developed here than in the first example, so attacking the d5/e6-pawns is a lot easier. Note that White hasn’t committed the light-squared bishop and still has the option of g3/Bh3.

That wasn’t Black’s only mistake, but it quickly made things more difficult for Black. After the natural 8. Qd2 a6 9. exf6 Qxf6 10. O-O-O Bd6 11. g3! b5?? (not what Black needs to be focusing on!) 12. dxc5 Bxc5 13. Bh3 Black’s position is virtually beyond repair. Although it doesn’t immediately work out tactically, White is already entertaining the idea of Nxd5 (as happened a few moves later).

Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 6.20.50 PM
After 13. Bh3

Unfortunately, the rest of the game was not particularly hard to predict. White soon won both the e6 and d5 pawns, and still managed to attack Black’s weak kingside. This goes to show how seemingly insignificant differences can completely change the positional assessment of an …f6 break!

Screen Shot 2017-10-24 at 6.23.28 PM
After 25. Bg6, Black resigns

 

 

 

Free Game Analysis:  Queen’s Gambit Declined

Today’s Free Game Analysis submission comes from Michael Chiflikyan, an up-and-coming Illinois native who has almost doubled his rating from 700 at the beginning of this year.  Although he lost this game against a player much higher rated than him, Michael was able to cross 1400 for the first time after this tournament, so congratulations to him on the milestone!

This game starts off with a Queen’s Gambit Declined through a transposition, a fairly popular line among players of all strengths.  Michael, who has the black pieces, played fairly solidly throughout the opening and middlegame, but a few inaccuracies in the endgame was all it took for his higher-rated opponent to pounce at the end.  Let’s take a look for ourselves.

Kalghatgi (2138) – Chiflikyan (1397), CCC 2017

I was pleasantly surprised when I received this game from Isaac for today’s article, as Michael’s opponent was someone that I had played in a tournament game a few years ago!  As aforementioned, this game starts with a Queen’s Gambit declined, which I have some experience playing with the black side, but probably not as much as others on Chess^Summit.  So, I will attempt to analyze the opening to the best of my ability, but from the middlegame onwards it should be smooth sailing.  You can use the game player provided (from the game title) to follow along or use the text and boards in the article itself.

  1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5

Completing the transposition to the 1. … d5 line that has been played maybe a billion times by now.  The Nimzo, with 3. … Bb4, is more popular in this specific position, but the sole explanation for that is because this move order is one of only two realistic move orders to reach the Nimzo, while the QGD position can be reached in many different ways and thus the games are spread out over the database.

  1. cxd5

The exchange variation, which leads to one of the most popular and recognizable positions among QGD players from both sides.  White gets a simple setup with a queen-bishop battery and aims his pieces towards Black’s kingside, while Black will attempt to counter in the center with a c5 push at some point.

  1. … exd5 5. Bg5 c6 6. Qc2
FGA1
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 6. Qc2

White will indeed go for this setup.

  1. … Nbd7

This move, along with Be7, is interchangeable, as they will all eventually end up on these squares.  However, an interesting idea that has been tried more than a few times is the move Na6 in this position, which aims to swing the knight over to e6 via c7 and gain a tempo on the bishop.

  1. e3 Be7 8. Bd3 h6

This bishop kick can be helpful, but in my opinion, it’s probably too early for this.  The move isn’t running away, as White won’t move his dark-squared bishop unless he has to.  Notice that White’s g1-knight still has to be developed before White can castle kingside.  It would be better to castle and let White make the decision as to where he wants to go with his last undeveloped minor piece before committing to a move like h6, which can never be taken back.  The reasoning is that when White’s knight is on f3, the move h6 takes away the crucial g5 square from the knight; but, when White develops his knight to e2, this move permanently weakens the g6 square for black, which can become a problem when white plays an eventual move like Ne2-f4.  It also inhibits Black’s ability to clog the b1-h7 diagonal with a move like Ng6.

  1. Bh4 0-0 10. Nge2
FGA2
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 10. Nge2

White chooses the correct square for the kingside knight.

  1. … b6

A step in the wrong direction for Black.  With immense pressure from both of White’s bishops, Black’s usual plan in this position is to stuff the b1-h7 diagonal while simultaneously trading pieces.  This is achieved by playing 10. … Re8, which is followed by 11. 0-0 Ne4 when the discovery tactic on White’s dark-squared bishop helps Black.  With a move like b6, Black commits to this path of development for the light-squared bishop, giving White time to build up a center.

  1. 0-0 Bb7 12. f3 c5 13. Bf2 Rc8 14. Rc1
FGA3
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 14. Rac1

Up until now, all of the positions in this game have appeared in the database.  But after Black’s next move, the players officially go out of book.

  1. … Re8 15. Ng3 Bf8 16. Rfd1

From an objective standpoint, I don’t really like this move for White.  It’s unclear where the rook belongs right now, but it definitely doesn’t belong on the closed d-file, and it doesn’t seem like the file will be opened anytime soon, especially with Black’s queen still on it.  I would have preferred a move like Qd2, which would move White’s queen off of the semi-open c-file and give more breathing room to the light-squared bishop.  This would also keep the position flexible since it hasn’t become apparent where White should move his f1-rook.

  1. … a6 17. Qd2 Nb8?!

Here, Black should have seriously considered the move c4, temporarily locking the center and going for pawn play on the queenside.  Black can follow up with b5, b4, a5, and if White attempts to counterstrike in the center with e4, it would finally open the diagonal for Black’s light-squared bishop, which has thus far not seen any action.  Instead, Black opts for a knight maneuver that, frankly, doesn’t harmonize with the rest of the position.

  1. Bf5 Rc7
FGA4
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 18. … Rc7

Black’s position is in a tangled mess, and White should have struck while the iron was hot with the immediate e4!  which would create further disorder within Black’s camp.  However, White fails to capitalize, leaving Black with an unattractive but surprisingly solid position.

  1. Na4 cxd4 20. cxd4 Rxc1 21. Rxc1 Bc6 22. Nc3 Bd7 23. Bb1 Nc6
FGA5
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 23. … Nc6
  1. a3 Ne7?

Another somewhat puzzling move.  Black’s knight is positioned fine for now on c6.  It is, in fact, the f8-bishop that should be brought into the game at some point.  The text move suffocates the bishop and creates disharmony within the position.  A better plan would have been Bd6 followed by Qb8, taking control of the h2-b8 diagonal and eyeing the f4-square.

  1. Nce2?

Missing his chance.  White should have played the practical Qd3! which simultaneously attacks the undefended a6-pawn and threatens Nh5, a move that would create chaos on the kingside with sudden mate threats.

  1. … Qa8 26. Rc3 Rc8 27. Qc2 Rxc3 28. Qxc3 Qc6 29. Qxc6 Nxc6
FGA6
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 29. … Nxc6

Let’s stop for a moment and take stock.  In a flurry, the remaining major pieces dropped off the board, and we are left with an endgame where all of the minor pieces are still left on the board, which is very rare.  The black knight has returned to c6, allowing the f8-bishop to finally see light again.  The pawn structure is virtually identical for both sides, with each side having 3 pawn islands, one of them being an isolated queen pawn.  If a couple pair of minor pieces were already off the board, this game would be very close to a draw already.  Yet, this is not the case, so there is still a game left.

  1. Nf4 Bd6 31. Nd3 Ne7

It shouldn’t make too much of a difference, but I do believe that it was important to prevent a piece from invading on e5.  This knight maneuver voluntarily takes a defender off of the e5 square, and just like last time, it is unclear where exactly this knight is going from here.

  1. Ne5 Bb5 33. Bc2 Nd7?!

It’s almost like a mirage about Black’s light-squared bishop.  It seems so wide open and that it controls a lot of space, but in reality, it only has one “safe” square other than the one it is occupying right now, and that is e8.  And, unfortunately, Black probably had to play a move like Be8 in order to safeguard the bishop.  Black must have played Nd7 believing that White had to do something about the e5-knight right then and there, but White capitalizes on this error cleanly.

  1. a4! Bc6 35. Nf5!
FGA7
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 35. Nf5!

This is a funny looking position, not gonna lie.  Discussing the geometry of it would be pretty cool, but at that point, we would be going off on a tangent.  In all seriousness, Black is able to navigate the complications and find the best continuation, but White will emerge with the bishop pair in a positionally-superior position.

  1. … Nxf5

Another possible continuation would have been 35. … Nxe5 36. dxe5 Nxf5 37. exd6 Nxd6 38. Bxb6 where White is still slightly better.

  1. Nxc6 Ne7 37. Nxe7+ Bxe7 38. Bd3 a5 39. Bb5 Nf6 40. Bg3
FGA8
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 40. Bg3

White is positionally dominating this position.  The bishops rake into Black’s position and there aren’t many useful squares for Black’s pieces.  While this position isn’t completely lost for Black yet, he is certainly losing the thread on the position, as a single misstep will prove costly.  It’s as if Black has to walk a tightrope for the rest of the game.

  1. … Bd8

Only move to avoid material loss.

  1. Kf2 Kf8

Maybe not the best plan, as the king still can’t progress very far.  Perhaps black could have thought about activating the king with g5 and Kg7, but it still doesn’t change much.  What’s unfortunate for Black is that he can’t even kick White’s dark-squared bishop off the h2-b8 diagonal with a move like Nh5 since the bishop can hide with Bb8 and absolutely nothing can touch it.

  1. Bd6+ Be7

This move loses a pawn, although it’s hard to criticize Black at this point.  Moving the king right back to g8 would have saved material, but it doesn’t get Black anywhere.  Even though this would have objectively been the better move, it’s no fun to sit around and wait for your opponent to walk his king over to the queenside and gobble up your pawns.

  1. Bc7 Bb4 44. Bxc7 Ne8 45. Ke3 g5 46. Bc5+
FGA9
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 46. Bc5+

White trades into a pure bishop v. knight endgame where he has the superior minor piece and a pawn to the good.  Now, it is just a matter of technique.

  1. … Bxc5 47. dxc5 Nc7 48. Kd4 Ke7 49. Bd3 Ke6 50. g3 f5 51. h3 h5 52. g4
FGA10
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 52. g4

Forcing open lines on the kingside and allowing the bishop to penetrate.  With the d5 pawn on a light square and no way for black to protect the d5 pawn and simultaneously drive the White king away from d4 quickly enough, it is only a few moves until White will win more material.

  1. … fxg4 53. fxg4 h4 54. Bh7 Kd7 55. Bg8 Kc6 56. Bf7
FGA11
Kalghatgi – Chiflikyan – position after 56. Bf7

Zugzwang.  White is clearly winning now, so the rest of the game will be provided without notes.

  1. … Na6 57. Bxd5+ Kd7 58. Be4 Nb4 59. Ke5 Nc6+ 60. Bxc6+ Kxc6 61. Kd4 Kc7 62. Kd5 Kd7 63. c6+ Kc8 64. Kd6 Kd8 65. c7+ Kc8 66. b3 1-0

An unfortunate but very instructive loss for Michael, who went on to play a very nice rest of the tournament and gain rating.  There were definitely a few key points that we can take away from today’s game.

  1. Endgames, endgames, endgames! It is perhaps the most important phase of the game, but it is also the least studied. Many games come down to the wire in the endgame, and one has to know as much as possible about the endgame in order to avoid making mistakes in textbook positions.  We saw in this game how one mistake was all it took to take a potential draw into a loss.
  2. Bishop pair – It has been said an innumerable number of times in the past, but the bishop pair has a lot of value to it. In a relatively open position with weaknesses, the two bishops can come to life and can even decide the game in some cases. We saw in today’s game how White’s two bishops together restricted both of Black’s minor pieces and even the king to an extent.
  3. Middlegame plans/ideas – When playing an opening, it is important to know the specific ideas, maneuvers, and plans associated with the opening in the middlegame. In today’s game, we discussed how a common idea is to trade off at least a pair of minor pieces early with the Re8, Ne4 idea. Instead, Black went with a fianchetto of the c8-bishop, which led to a somewhat awkward position later in the middlegame.

Hopefully, the topics we covered today will help you in your future games!  I wish Michael and everyone else good luck in their future games, and, as always, thanks for reading!  I’ll see you next time.